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Plants Matching pisum

Returned 15 results. Page 1 of 2.

Image of Pisum photo by: Gerald L. Klingaman

Gerald L. Klingaman

(Pea)

The bean, legume, or pea family is a diverse, cosmopolitan group with many culturally and economically important members. It is the third largest plant family in existence with nearly 20,000 named species described. These flowering dicots may be trees, shrubs or herbs and exist everywhere worldwide save the icy poles. They are characterized by their elongated, many-seeded fruits (legumes) that open via longitudinal sutures. Most Fabaceae form root nodules containing symbiotic bacteria that fix atmospheric...

Image of Pisum sativum photo by: James H. Schutte

James H. Schutte

(Garden Pea)

Few cool season crops are as satisfying and welcome in spring as the humble garden pea. Peas have been cultivated for their edible seeds and pods for thousands of years. Their area of origin is thought to be the eastern Mediterranean region, including Turkey, Iran, Iraq and Syria, where wild pea plants still exist.

These herbaceous annuals have four distinct cultivation types that bear different fruits, or pea pods. These four types are: pod peas that are shelled for fresh peas, pod peas that...

Image of Pisum sativum

All-America Selections

(Garden Pea)

Quick to ripen its large pods filled with eight to ten very sweet peas, this All American Selection produces slender, short vines laden with very plump pods that are easy to shell. The sweet, buttery peas can be eaten fresh or dried. The pods of this self-fertile, disease-resistant cultivar are ready to harvest only 55 to 60 days after sowing.

Few cool season crops are as satisfying and welcome in spring as the humble garden pea. Peas have been cultivated for their edible seeds and pods for...

(Sugar Snap Pea)

The early snow pea 'Dwarf White Sugar' bears masses of white blooms and flavorful pods on compact vines. Days to harvest depend on which part of the plant is harvested. Pea shoots can be harvested in 30 to 32 days, flowers in 40 to 42 days and immature snow pea pods in 57 to 60 days. Plant a few seeds at weekly intervals for a longer harvest season.

Few cool season crops are as satisfying and welcome in spring as the humble garden pea. Peas have been cultivated for their edible seeds and pods...

(Garden Pea, Shelling Pea)

The shelling pea, ‘Little Marvel’, is an heirloom selection that was first introduced in the early 1900s. It’s a self-fertile, compact, bushy pea that is wilt resistance and produces lots of plump pods filled with round, green peas. They can be hulled and eaten fresh or dried and stored. The fresh peas are generally ready to harvest in 60 to 65 day after seeding.

Few cool season crops are as satisfying and welcome in spring as the humble garden pea. Peas have been cultivated for their edible...

(Field Pea, Partridge Pea)

Few cool season crops are as satisfying and welcome in spring as the humble garden pea. Peas have been cultivated for their edible seeds and pods for thousands of years. Their area of origin is thought to be the eastern Mediterranean region, including Turkey, Iran, Iraq and Syria, where wild pea plants still exist.

These herbaceous annuals have four distinct cultivation types that bear different fruits, or pea pods. These four types are: pod peas that are shelled for fresh peas, pod peas that...

Image of Pisum sativum

Jessie Keith

(Garden Pea, Snap Pea)

Snap peas have been cultivated in gardens since the 1800s and used to be called “butter peas”, but modern snaps, like ‘Sugar Snap’, bear little resemblance to the old types.

This hybrid was developed in the late 1960s by Dr. Calvin Lamborn and Dr. M. C. Parker for the Gallatin Valley Seed Company, a Boise, Idaho company dedicated to pea breeding and development. It was produced from a cross between a thick-podded shell pea and snow pea and became commercially available in 1979. That year it...

Image of Pisum sativum

James H. Schutte

(Garden Pea)

The shell pea, ‘Tall Telephone’ (sometimes called ‘Alderman’), is an heirloom selection that has been grown since the early 1880s. It produces long vines and large pods full of round, green peas that are remarkably sweet and tender. These can be eaten fresh or dried. The peas of this self-fertile cultivar are generally ready to harvest 70 to 75 day after seeding.

Few cool season crops are as satisfying and welcome in spring as the humble garden pea. Peas have been cultivated for their edible...

(Snow Pea)

Few cool season crops are as satisfying as the humble garden pea. Peas have been cultivated for their edible seeds and pods for thousands of years. Snow, or mangetout, peas are flat and eaten immature (pod and all). If harvested young, these peas are virtually stringless. They are favored in Asian cooking and often used in stir fry. Many cultivars reach maturity 60 days after seeding.

Pea plants are vines, though some have shrubbier habits. Their pale green leaves are compound. The stems are...

(Dwarf Gray Sugar Snow Pea, Snow Pea)

The versatile snow pea, ‘Dwarf Gray Sugar’, is an heirloom selection that has been cultivated for more than 200 years. In recent years, it has resurfaced in popularity because of its tender reddish shoots and flowers and green pods are all edible. This pea cultivar is self-fertile and produces pods early. Days to harvest depend on which part of the plant is harvested. Pea shoots can be harvested in 30 to 32 days, flowers in 40 to 42 days and immature snow pea pods in 57 to 60 days. Plant a few seeds...