Advanced Search Filters

Plant Type
Hardiness Zone
Heat Zone
Sunset Zone
Function
Sun Exposure
Soil Moisture
Water Requirement

Plants Matching usda hardiness zone 1

Returned 15 results. Page 1 of 2.

Image of Hippuris vulgaris photo by: Bosh Bruening

Bosh Bruening

(Common Mare's Tail)

The common mare’s tail is a prolific aquatic plant with bottlebrush-like green foliage. It can be found in wetlands across all of North America, save the Deep South and southeastern states, and is also found in waterways in South America, Eurasia, and even Australia. So it truly has a world or pandemic distribution.

Hardy and very vigorous, this perennial produces strong underground rhizomes which travel through water-logged soils and send up new shoots. Each hollow stem is lined with fine,...

Image of Jungermannia polymorpha photo by: Bernd Haynold, Wikipedia Commons Contributor

Bernd Haynold, Wikipedia Commons Contributor

(Common Liverwort, Marchantia)

A low-growing mat of green growing in a sunny location is usually a telltale sign of the common liverwort. It looks somewhat similar to the closely-related mosses and hornworts. The common liverwort is a primitive, non-vascular plant native to all parts of the world, from the tropics to the polar tundra, in a wide array of habitats from cliffs, heath lands, bogs and forests. Liverworts do not flower, but reproduce with spores or by developing more vegetative growth. They also have two physical forms...

Image of Larix laricina photo by: James H. Schutte

James H. Schutte

(Eastern Larch, Tamarack)

Illuminating the fall landscape with golden yellow needles, tamarack reaches skyward with its tall, open-branched, pyramid-like form. A tree native to much of Canada and the far northern United States, it is a relatively slow-growing deciduous conifer that thrives where soils are moist and summers cool. It is often found growing in bogs alongside wild blueberries and cranberries.

The needles are green to blue-green, short, three-sided and arranged in spiraled clusters atop short stubby spurs....

(Blue Sparkler Eastern Larch, Eastern Larch)

Brightening the landscape with a dense foliar display of light blue-green needles, Blue Sparkler dwarf tamarack also heralds fall with golden yellow needles. Native to much of Canada and the extreme northern United States, this variety was selected by Sid Waxman of the University of Connecticut. It is a vigorous, dwarfed, deciduous shrub that will become broader than tall.

The needles are bright blue-green, short, three-sided and arranged densely in spiral clusters atop short stubby spurs. The...

Image of Larix laricina

Mark A. Miller

(Deborah Waxman Eastern Larch, Eastern Larch)

A compact, conical dwarf shrub, the blue-green needles of Deborah Waxman dwarf tamarack turn coppery gold in autumn. Native to much of Canada and the extreme northern United States, this variety was selected by Sid Waxman of the University of Connecticut. It is a very slow growing, dwarf, deciduous cone-bearing shrub with dense branches and needled foliage.

The needles are bright blue-green, short, three-sided and arranged densely in spiral clusters atop short stubby spurs. The branchlets are...

(Eastern Larch, Lanark Eastern Larch)

Brightening the landscape with a dense foliar display of light green needles on yellow branchlets, Lanark dwarf tamarack also heralds fall with golden yellow needles. Native to much of Canada and the extreme northern United States, it is a slow growing, dwarfed, deciduous shrub that will become round and chest-high with time.

The needles are bright green, short, three-sided and arranged densely in spiral clusters atop short stubby spurs. The thin, yellowy, young branchlets are held up and out...

(Eastern Larch, Newport Beauty Eastern Larch)

A tiny, dense foliar balled shrub teeming with blue-green needles, Newport Beauty dwarf tamarack also greets fall with golden yellow foliage. Native to much of Canada and the extreme northern United States, it's a dense, dwarf, deciduous conifer that very slowly becomes a rounded mass.

The needles are mildly blue-green, short, three-sided and arranged densely in spiral clusters atop short stubby spurs. The short, young branchlets are held out from the dense congestion of foliage. With considereable...

Image of Larix sibirica photo by: James H. Schutte

James H. Schutte

(Siberian Larch)

A tall and narrow tree with somewhat upward-held branches, the Siberian larch has finely textured, soft needles that become yellow in autumn and drop before winter. From the mountains of Europe eastward into northern and central Asia, this cone-bearing tree is deciduous with a sienna brown bark that is scaly and lightly ridged. With age it attains a very narrow pyramidal shape.

In spring the thin yellow-gray branches fill with short, soft, light green needles that have two white bands on their...

Image of Lemna trisulca photo by: Christian Fischer

Christian Fischer

(Duckmeat, Frog's Buttons, Ivyleaf Duckweed, Star Duckweed)

From late spring to fall frost, the still waters on ponds, lakes and the edges of slow-moving streams may reveal a floating mat of star duckweed. Native to the cool-summer areas of the Northern Hemisphere, star duckweed sinks to the bottom of the body of water in winter to escape death by freezing.

When ice disappears and water warms up in spring, the dormant leaf bodies of star duckweed rise up to the water's surface. Floating atop the water, the light to medium green leaves of star duckweed...

Image of Picea mariana photo by: Jesse Saylor

Jesse Saylor

(Black Spruce, Maryland Spruce)

The black spruce is an elegant evergreen tree that is spire-like with drooping branches that upcurve like eyelashes at their tips. It is a native of northern North America, from Alaska to the northernmost tier of the eastern United States. Often found growing in cool, moist soils, it has a shallow root system and is easily toppled by winds. This is a boreal species.

The needles of black spruce are four-sided, shiny and dark blue-green. The spry branches are relatively short, angle downward and...