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Plants Matching biennial

Returned 54 results. Page 1 of 6.

(Cape Bugloss)

Cape bugloss is an biennial or short-lived perennial that is a good choice for a dry, sunny locations in the garden. Often simply grown as an annual flower, this South African native has cheery bright sky blue flowers with white throats that appear on upright stems above coarsely textured lance-shaped foliage. Bees will frequent these cup-shaped flowers across the summer.

Grow cape bugloss in full sun in a moist but perfectly draining soil. Trim off spent flower stems to encourage a second flowering...

Image of Anchusa capensis

James H. Schutte

(Blue Angel Bugloss, Cape Bugloss)

Cape bugloss is an biennial or short-lived perennial that is a good choice for a dry, sunny locations in the garden. A native of South Africa, 'Blue Angel' bears summertime flowers of a deep ocean blue that appear on upright stems above coarsely textured lance-shaped foliage. Bees will frequent these cup-shaped flowers across the summer.

Grow 'Blue Angel' in full sun in a moist but perfectly draining soil. Trim off spent flower stems to encourage a second flowering cycle. It makes a good edging...

Image of Angelica gigas photo by: Jesse Saylor

Jesse Saylor

(Korean Angelica, Purple Angelica)

The stately purple angelica is both an ornamental and herbal garden biennial or short-lived perennial that originates from the meadows and river valleys of China, Korea and Japan. It's a towering majestic garden plant that produces huge umbels of purplish flowers in summer. These are supported by equally appealing tall, branched, purple stems.

The coarsely divided, compound leaves of this large, clump-forming herb are purplish green. Conspicuous purple leaf sheaths surround the base of each...

Image of Barbarea vulgaris photo by: Jesse Saylor

Jesse Saylor

(Garden Yellowrocket)

Looking like wild mustard or wild radish, the garden yellowrocket bears small cross-shaped yellow flowers from early spring to early summer. This biennial or very short-lived perennial typically grows in the cooler months, from autumn to spring, becoming dormant in the heat of summer.

The long taproot supports a rosette of medium green leaves that are elongated with lobes. The flower stem arises from the center of this rosettes and branches many times to support scores of tiny lemon yellow blossoms...

Image of Beta vulgaris

James H. Schutte

(Beet, Early Wonder Tall Beet)

Beets are wonderfully colorful root vegetables. Standard red-rooted forms, like ‘Early Wonder Tall’, have rich red roots with brilliant magenta juice that stains everything. This fine selection produces firm, round, sweet roots quickly and early in the season (60-harvest days).

Usually grown as annuals, beets are actually biennials, which means they generate large roots and lush foliage in the first year and flower, set seed and die in the second. The flowers are unimpressive but produce lots...

Image of Beta vulgaris

Jessie Keith

(Beet, Golden Detroit Beet)

Beets are wonderfully colorful root vegetables. ‘Golden Detroit’ produces firm, round, sweet, orange-red roots quickly and early in the season (55 harvest days). This fine selection turns yellow when cooked and its juices do not stain like red beets.

Usually grown as annuals, beets are actually biennials, which means they generate large roots and lush foliage in the first year and flower, set seed and die in the second. The flowers are unimpressive but produce lots of seed that can be saved from...

Image of Campanula pyramidalis photo by: Jesse Saylor

Jesse Saylor

(Chimney Bellflower)

Towering skyward and the last of the bellflowers to bloom, chimney bellflower has heart-shaped leaves at the base of the summer-occurring flowerspike that bears white or light blue blossoms. A very short-lived perennial that is usually regarded as a biennial, this herbaceous plant is native to northern Italy and the Balkan States.

The medium to light green leaves are in a loose basal rosette, which each blade oval or lance-shaped with teethed edges. As early as early summer but often into mid-...

Image of Carduus nutans photo by: Jesse Saylor

Jesse Saylor

(Musk Thistle, Nodding Thistle)

Although an impressive plant with ornate leaves and showy red-violet flowers, the nodding thistle remains one of the most widespread weeds in temperate climates. Native to Europe and Asia, it grows as a biennial with deep taproot, but in milder climates grows also as a winter annual.

In its first year of growth, the nodding thistle develops a basal rosette of deeply lobed, spiny, dark green leaves. As the plant ages, often in the second year, the rosette sends up a stem lined with more spiny...

Image of Corydalis sempervirens photo by: James H. Schutte

James H. Schutte

(Colic Weed, Pale Fumewort)

Native to rocky and sandy slopes and clearings over much of Canada and the northern United States, this biennial bears clusters of small bicolored flowers from early summer to fall above rosettes of lacy blue-green leaves. Deployed on erect, calf- to waist-high stems, the spurred, purplish-pink flowers have gaping yellow mouths. The blooms give rise to small pod-like capsules containing round shiny black seeds that are distributed by ants. Plants will self-sow where happy. Plants die at the end of...

Image of Cynoglossum amabile photo by: TL

TL

(Chinese Forget-Me-Not, Summer Forget-Me-Not)

Prized for its summer-long display of azure flowers, this short-lived tender perennial from East Asia is typically grown as an annual or biennial.

Dense clumps of felted, gray-green, lance-shaped to oval leaves give rise to one-sided sprays of small, five-lobed, sky-blue flowers on calf- to knee-high stems. Flowering begins in early spring or 2 months after sowing, continuing as long as temperatures remain mild. Small, bristly, bur-like fruits follow the flowers. Self-sowing often occurs, sometimes...